Jun 30, 2022  
Graduate 2021-2023 
    
Graduate 2021-2023

College of Agriculture


Chandra Reddy, Ph.D., Dean
Office: 213 Agricultural Biotechnology Building
(615) 963-7561
creddy@tnstate.edu

The College of Agriculture is the premier land-grant unit of Tennessee State University. The College has a mandate to educate the students in a classroom setting and to also reach out to the population of Tennessee to provide the research, education, and training necessary for our citizens to lead healthy, and productive lives.  The College undertakes its teaching, research and extension functions through its academic departments, the research arm of the College - the Institute of Food, Agricultural and Environmental Research (IFAER) and the Cooperative Extension Program (CEP). The research and extension programs within the College of Agriculture are integrated with the academic programs to create a rich academic environment that enables to create a pool of diverse and talented faculty to teach and mentor graduate and undergraduate students.

Mission

The College of Agriculture carries out the Land Grant mandates of the University in teaching, research, and service. The major goal of the College is to satisfy the educational needs and aspirations of both traditional and non-traditional students enrolled in its academic programs.

Vision

The College of Agriculture will:

  • Offer a differentiated, relevant, and rigorous curriculum to provide students with a high-quality education that equips them for the demands and opportunities of the 21st century;
  • Cultivate an environment of excellence and integrity that values human capital while encouraging productivity and compliance;
  • Achieve national and international prominence in research and the dissemination of science-based knowledge to enhance food, agricultural and human systems;
  • Promote diversity among students, faculty, and staff; and
  • Support innovation in a nurturing environment.

Programs

Master of Science

Professional Science Masters

Certificate

Department of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences

Go to information for Department of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.

Courses

Agricultural & Environmental Sciences

  •  

    AGSC 5010 - Foundations of Agricultural and Extension Education (3)


    The course is designed to introduce individuals to the intracurricular programs associated with formal, informal, and nonformal programs of agricultural education.  School-based program components such as the classroom, the school lab, Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) programs, FFA, and school and community relationships will guide much of the discussion in this course.  Nonformal education components such as 4-H and adult models of AEE (i.e. Young Farmers) will also be studied. Subject matter will also explore the philosophical foundations and historical development of school-based and non-formal Agricultural Education in the United States as well as emerging trends.
  •  

    AGSC 5012 - Food Supply and Value Chain Management (3)


    The course provides a graduate-level premise to food production, system sapproaches and supply chain management strategies and applications. It focuses on methods involved in food products supply chain systems from farm to fork; environmentally, technologically, economically and socially. The course emphasizes on integrated animal and crop-based food supply system(s) of the United States and internationally.
  •  

    AGSC 5014 - Food Marketing and Retail Management (3)


    This course introduces students to the principles and methods of agribusiness marketing: marketing process, strategic planning, market research, consumer behavior, segmentation or targeting or positioning, product or service design and branding, pricing decisions and strategies, retailing and value-delivery channels, promotions/advertising, and holistic and sustainable marketing. The course takes an analytical and practical approach: providing analytical methods, real-life examples and case studies, and engaging students in applications and analyses.
  •  

    AGSC 5015 - Principles of Organic Agriculture (3)


    In this course, students learn the principles of organic agriculture as applied to plant growth, development, and culture. Students are acquainted with both theoretical and applied aspects of organic agriculture. Topics include concept and scope of organic farming; Land; Soil; Organic certification; Equipment; Crops; Best management practices; Economic concepts for optimal production, Marketing etc. Students get `hands-on’ experience in skills of growing organic agricultural products with focus on crops. Business aspects with emphasis on marketing will be discussed using case studies; market and business plans. Career opportunities will also be explored. 
  •  

    AGSC 5020 - Teaching and Learning Methods in Agricultural and Extension Education (3)


    Study and practice in teaching procedures that foster creativity, engagement, critical thinking, leadership development, classroom/laboratory management, and technical competency in agriculture will be taught and modeled through a variety of instructional strategies.
  •  

    AGSC 5030 - Curriculum Development and Program Leadership in Agricultural and Extension Education (3)


    The course is designed to prepare individuals for teaching responsibilities associated with curriculum and program planning in 1) school-based agricultural education (i.e. high school and/or middle school) and 2) non-formal agricultural education (extension/4-H). Topics to be covered include program organization and content identification, preparation of instructional objectives, guidelines for the selection and development of instructional materials, adult education programs, classroom management, as well as youth leadership development (FFA/4-H) and experiential learning (SAE).   
  •  

    AGSC 5040 - Program Planning, Development and Evaluation (3)


    Concepts and principles of planning Agricultural & Extension Education programs at the local, regional, and state level; utilization of advisory councils and citizen committees; study of the administrative structure and legislative mandates, principles and techniques of program evaluation.  
  •  

    AGSC 5050 - Methods of Teaching Agricultural and Environmental Stem (3)


    Planning, implementing and evaluating educational programs of agricultural/environmental sciences and engineering (including high school Agriscience courses offered for science credit); course and lesson planning; laboratory facilities and equipment; and instructional methods and techniques for agriscience and ag engineering.  
  •  

    AGSC 5060 - Statistics for Research (3)


    Training and skills in research design, analyzing data, presentation of data, and drawing conclusions, with special emphasis on descriptive inferences.
  •  

    AGSC 5080 - Agribusiness Management and Market Analysis (3)


    Introduction to and growth of the U.S. agribusiness industry, its scope and composition. Evolution and composition of basic managerial principles, organization, operation, and administration of agribusiness firms especially under situation of risk and uncertainty. Managerial Methodology Application of economic theory and Statistical methods, the analysis of prices, and marketing of agribusiness products.
  •  

    AGSC 5090 - Food and Fiber Industry (3)


    The economics of production, competition, markets, and policy for the food and fiber sector of the economy. While the course stresses functional relationships and theoretical principles, descriptive material is included to enhance one’s understanding of current problems and the interrelationships between agricultural and general economy, identification of relevant issues, review of criteria for evaluating program development of policies.  

     

  •  

    AGSC 5100 - Environmental, Resource Economics and Management (3)


    The course analyzes major environmental and resource issues in relation to operations of agribusinesses using economic principles and alternative management scenarios. Market and non-market approaches to valuation of environmental and natural resources will be discussed in conjunction with the regulatory framework and management institutions.
  •  

    AGSC 5110 - Research Methods (3)


    The objectives of this course are: (1) to develop an understanding of research philosophies, methods, and procedures; (2) to gain experience in developing and designing research projects, organizing and analyzing research data.
  •  

    AGSC 5120 - Thesis Writing (Thesis Option) (4)


    This course is designed to provide instruction that will enable the student to adequately prepare a thesis from his or her on-going thesis research under the direction of the major advisor and guidance committee. The format of the thesis must conform to that of the subject matter area and the requirements of the Graduate School.
  •  

    AGSC 5130 - Advanced Animal Nutrition (3)


    Devoted to the study of nutrients and their metabolism; studies of recent developments in animal nutrition, experimental procedures and application in commercial feeding.
  •  

    AGSC 5140 - Contemporary Issues in Animal Science (3)


    Students will be allowed to select a problem of interest, conduct an exhaustive literature search and present findings in written form. Discussions on progress will prevail during class periods.
  •  

    AGSC 5150 - Livestock Production and Management (3)


    Provides an opportunity for the student to receive advanced training in the care and management of purebred herds, commercial herds, and herd development.
  •  

    AGSC 5160 - Animal Genetics and Breeding (3)


    A study of the principles of genetics with emphasis on breed improvement involving change of gene frequency, role of selection, selection table of contents, importance of pedigree and methods of estimating heritability.
  •  

    AGSC 5170 - Advanced Poultry Production and Management (3)


    Devoted to studying the principles and current practices in production, management and marketing of eggs, broilers, and turkeys; recognition of field problems, and how to solve such problems economically.
  •  

    AGSC 5180 - Soil Classification (3)


    A study of the basis of soil classification, genesis and morphology of zonal soils of the United States. Emphasis placed on the important series of Tennessee. Prerequisite(s): AGSC 2200, 4230. Two lectures and one laboratory.
  •  

    AGSC 5190 - Plant Breeding (3)


    A study of the methods, principles and results of plant improvement work, hereditary variation and the general principles of plant breeding. Prerequisite(s): AGSC 1200.
  •  

    AGSC 5220 - Plant Growth Substances (3)


    A general study of the organic substances which affect plant growth and development. Special emphasis will be placed on the auxins and cytokinins.
  •  

    AGSC 5230 - Advanced Propagation of Horticultural Plants (3)


    A study of the methods of propagating horticultural plants, including seedage, cuttage, and grafting of both economic and ornamental plants. Two lectures and one laboratory period.
  •  

    AGSC 5240 - Plant Protection (3)


    This course covers basic information needed to recognize problems caused by pathogens, insects, and weeds and the management of these problems. The courses will offer information on ecological and economic basis for decision making in integrated pest management (IPM) for diseases, insects, and weeds. The course will cover case studies on successful IPM programs, IPM obstacles, and future prospects. Two lectures and one laboratory period.

      Two field trips required. Two lectures and one laboratory period.

  •  

    AGSC 5260 - Environmental Analysis (3)


    This course provides advanced hands-on training of analytical principles in the field of environmental chemistry. This course will focus primarily on environmental sampling techniques as they relate to environmental problems, advanced instrumentation used to trouble-shoot/ solve potential analytical problems, knowledge of quality controls/ quality assurance protocols, environmental data analysis, interpretation, and report writing skills. This course will be designed to have group projects where students will perform tasks necessary to assess environmental problems using advanced analytical skills. 
  •  

    AGSC 5270 - Biosecurity and Bioforensics (3)


    This is a two-part course comprising security and forensic aspects of biotechnology. Part one covers a wide range of topics related to biological threats posed to plant and animal agriculture, human health and food system from intentional, accidental or natural sources. It also covers technical and legislative strategies involved in protecting the agriculture and food systems from biological threats. The students will be introduced to and given a broad overview of the scope and nature of the agriculture food system including identification of professionals operating within this arena. Part two covers principles governing the application of biology and statistics in DNA genotyping and in applications such as solving crimes. Topics include evidence collection, documentation, examination and preservation, extraction and quantification of DNA, DNA profiling, and statistical analysis of DNA evidence.
  •  

    AGSC 5280 - Advanced Poultry Nutrition and Biotechnology (3)


    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop knowledge of principles of Poultry Nutrition and feeding. Topics include nutrient requirements of poultry, metabolic processes and the role of nutrients on performance, health and nutritional deficiency diseases of poultry, feed and drug regulations, common feed ingredients, additives, and supplements used in the poultry industry. The course will also address the application of biotechnology in poultry feeds and feeding, common feed ingredients used in poultry feeding and least cost feed formulation. The course will also emphasize practical feeding of poultry with emphasis on specific nutrient requirements. Prerequisite(s): AGSC 1410
  •  

    AGSC 5290 - Omics (3)


    With the advent of new technologies, omics has been used in different fields and applications. New applications are also emerging in the post-genomics era. These new fields including: pharmacogenomics, toxicogenomics, regulomics, spliceomics, and metagenomics are providing faster solutions to the global challenges in biomedicine, agriculture, and the environment. This course provides an insight into the applications of modern omics technologies to many problems in life sciences.
  •  

    AGSC 5300 - Applied Microeconomics in Agribusiness (3)


    This course develops expertise in quantitative problem-solving techniques necessary for decision-making in agribusiness with extensive use of computers. Introduction to the concepts and methods of applying econometric analyses to problems of economic research. Emphasis will be placed on the formulation and solution of business problems using selected quantitative tools such as linear programming, simulation, game theory, and inventory models.
  •  

    AGSC 5310 - International Agricultural Trade and Marketing (3)


    The course emphasizes economic development, trade theory, and its application to agricultural trade. Review of the fundamental trade theory, changing structure of international trade markets, U.S. trade policies for agriculture, and the role of international commodity trading agreement.
  •  

    AGSC 5320 - Wetlands Ecology and Management (3)


    The course provides an intermediate introduction to wetlands ecology and management. Course materials will provide students with a broad understanding of the function and ecological importance of wetlands. This course will focus on a variety of topics, including wetlands ecology, biology, management, condition assessment, delineation, and construction and mitigation. Students will be encouraged to answer biologically-relevant questions, including, “what ecological benefits do wetlands provide”, “what types of flora and fauna are dependent on wetlands”, “how can management be incorporated to maintain healthy wetland environments”, “what actually constitutes a wetland”, and “how can we determine biological integrity”.
  •  

    AGSC 5330 - Agribusiness Strategy (3)


    The course is designed to enhance learning through presentations of case studies and analyses of relevant issues by students and guest speakers from agribusinesses. Topics to be covered include but are not limited to location of business, supply of inputs, and international marketing tools.
  •  

    AGSC 5340 - Cell and Issue Culture (4)


    This course covers topics of basic techniques for preparation of various culture media, initiation of cell culture from plant and animal tissues, propagation of cells and tissues, principles and techniques for production of pharmaceutical compounds using cell and tissue culture. It is a dual list course for graduate and undergraduate students. Graduate students taking the class will be required to write a term paper which is not required for undergraduate students. This is a 4 credit course. No pre-requisites of courses for students.  
  •  

    AGSC 5350 - Independent Study of Contemporary Issues and Problems (3)


    This course is required for students choosing the non-thesis option for the Master of Science in Agricultural Sciences, the Master of Science in Environmental Sciences, or the Master of Science  in Food and Animal Sciences. The student with guidance from the major advisor will identify contemporary issues and problems in food, agricultural and environmental sciences, conduct a comprehensive literature review, and write a report in a format of a review paper. The intent of this course is to broaden students understanding of theory and methods and apply them to analyze selected issues and problems in a broader context in various areas of agriculture. The students will apply (synthesize) knowledge gained in various courses in presenting issues and problems and integrating the materials learned so as to apply them in his/her area of interest or problem at hand. The course will reflect students’ ability to analyze, explore, and synthesize knowledge and skill as well as communication skills.

    NOTE: This course may be used as an elective for students choosing the thesis option for the Master of Science in Agricultural Sciences, the Master of Science in Environmental Sciences, or the Master of Science in Food and Animal Sciences.

  •  

    AGSC 5380 - Industrial and Environmental Biotechnology 3


    INDUSTRIAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL BIOTECHNOLOGY. (3) This course covers the technology, applications, economic potential and implications of biotechnology application in industry and environmental fields. Directed at readers with a general interest in a specific technology. Topics include: 1) The scope and impact of industrial and Environmental Biotechnology, 2) History of industrial biotechnology, 3) Industrial systems biology and fermentation technology, 4) Directed evolution of industrial biocatalysts, 5) The industrial production of enzymes and applied biocatalysis, 6) Downstream processing in industrial biotechnology, 7) Industrial biotechnology in the chemical and pharmaceutical industries, 8) Industrial biotechnology in the food and feed sector, 9) Industrial biotechnology in the paper, pulp sector and biofuels, 10) Applications of Environmental Biotechnology, 11) Value-Added Biotechnological Products from Organic Wastes, 12) Drinking Water Treatment, 13) Phosphorus Removal, 14) Anaerobic Treatment by Methanogenesis 15) Detoxification of Hazardous Chemicals and Bioremediation and 16) Nanobiotechnology
  •  

    AGSC 5400 - Animal Reproductive Physiology 3


    This course is designed to study mammalian reproductive biology for enhanced livestock production. Basic and applied research on various aspects of reproductive physiology will be covered. Endocrine function will provide the foundation of most concepts discussed. Advanced assisted reproductive technologies will be considered along with traditional management techniques used to manipulate reproductive processes in livestock. Some related issues in laboratory animal, wildlife, companion animal, and human reproduction may also be introduced.
  •  

    AGSC 5440 - Reproductive Physiology (3)


    This course is designed to study mammalian reproductive biology for enhanced livestock production. Basic and applied research on various aspects on reproductive physiology will be covered. Endocrine function will provide the foundation of most concepts discussed. Advanced assisted reproductive technologies will be considered along with traditional management techniques used to manipulate reproductive processes in livestock. Some related issues in laboratory animal, wildlife, companion animal, and human reproduction may also be introduced.
  •  

    AGSC 5470 - Immunochemistry in Biotechnology (3)


    Immunochemistry in Biotechnology applies immunological principles to biochemical detection and diagnosis. The course comprises a series of classical immunological detection techniques that have been “gold standards” for most biochemical and diagnostic analyses. The integration of classical procedures with the advent of new genetic technologies (such as in Capture PCR, and ChipSeq) has been broadly used in different fields in agricultural, biomedical, pathological, diagnostic, and environmental sciences. This course provides both basic principles and practical procedure/demo of immunochemical technologies to confront many practical problems in life sciences. Prerequisites: AP Biology, College Biochemistry or better Immunology.
  •  

    AGSC 5500 - Environmental Issues and Sustainability (3)


    This course focuses on current environmental issues and provides students with an understanding of the scientific concepts behind important topics which include environmental sustainability, environmental regulations, climate change, and environmental pollution. Focus will be placed on environmental issues that relate to agriculture but may also include the natural environment. Identification of methods for preventing or reducing impact as well as improving environmental integrity and enhancing sustainability will be discussed. One lecture and one discussion period per week.
  •  

    AGSC 5510 - Ecosystem Science and Management (3)


    This course reviews the fundamental principles of ecology necessary to develop sustainable ecosystems and manage natural resources. The course will begin with a basic understanding of ecological principles and will transition to discuss ecosystem degradation and management challenges as they relate to ecosystem function. One of the central themes of this course will be identification of ecosystem services and how anthropogenic changes impact the delivery of these services. Emphasis will be placed on ecosystem services and processes that have significance on ecosystem function and restoration at multiple spatial (e.g., local, landscape, regional, global) scales. The course will also focus globally on major ecosystems and will discuss impacts that anthropogenic activities have on the ecological function in these systems.
  •  

    AGSC 5520 - Advanced Food Processing and Engineering (3)


    Prerequisite(s): AGSC 3690, MATH 1110 & CHEM 1110.
  •  

    AGSC 5530 - Forest Ecology and Management (3)


    This course emphasizes the ecology of forests and provides a comprehensive understanding of the common patterns found within forest ecosystems. The increasing threats and challenges that forest and managers face in the 21st century are assessed and the issues of human use and their impacts are explored in detail. Strategies for sustainable management forests are discussed. Different management guidelines are examined. Examples from various forests ecosystems across the USA are used as case studies.
  •  

    AGSC 5540 - Food Policies and Regulations (3)


    This course is to familiarize students with the current regulation of food products in the United States including issues such as food additive regulation, food labeling, dietary supplements, the regulation of genetic modifications, the protection of the food supply, food and food safety regulation, regulatory compliance, HACCP and the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act. Prerequisite: 
  •  

    AGSC 5550 - Food Safety and Sanitation (3)


    This course introduces the scientific principles behind food safety and sanitation practices as well as practical and effective methods which can be implemented in a plant to keep products safe. The course will focus on: identification and control of potential microbiological and toxicological hazards in foods, sanitation in food processing facilities and, cleaning compounds, water supplies; waste product disposal; and food regulations. “Hands-on” problem-solving skills will be emphasized on conducting sanitation and HACCP audits in actual processing plants.  Prerequisite(s): One year of any biology (BIOL 1110), one year of chemistry (CHEM 1110). Authorized equivalent courses or consent of instructor may be used in satisfying course pre- and co-requisites.
  •  

    AGSC 5560 - Food Product Development and Sensory Science (3)


    This graduate course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the food product development and the sensory analysis knowledge required in food industry. The overall goal is to provide the opportunity for students to integrate their training in food science and technology courses and related disciplines and to gain experience with the theory and practice of developing food products and analyze their sensory quality. This course familiarizes students with the food sensory analysis, starting with principles and procedures for assessing the sensory and hedonic properties of foods and consumer products. Appropriate test design (discriminative/descriptive/consumer), statistical analyses and data interpretation will be discussed. This course will help students to understand the sensory analysis and its application on food products. This is undertaken through an examination of the practical and theoretical aspects of sensory evaluation and analysis. Practical laboratory classes focus on test design and execution, sample presentation, data analysis, interpretation of results, and report writing. Students will learn the importance of sensory analysis, product profiling, how to conduct and interpret sensory results in a systematic manner.
  •  

    AGSC 5570 - Climate Change (3)


    This course will present an overview of the scientific understanding of climate change and role of human activities, including atmospheric processes, greenhouse effect, carbon cycling, physical evidence, impacts, and proposed global actions in response to climate change. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to 1) identify the main physical processes that impact global climate; 2) record and compare facts about historical mean annual global temperatures; 3) collect, organize, display, and interpret data about changes in atmospheric CO2; 4) demonstrate an understanding of the sources of greenhouse gases in terms of natural and human sources; 5) identify the most significant potential impacts of climate change; and 6) demonstrate learning by producing a final project based on the scientific understanding of climate change.
  •  

    AGSC 5590 - Advanced Technologies in Detection and Food Analysis (3)


    This course is to familiarize students with the current state of the art of modern analytical instruments, methodologies, and applications in detection and food analysis. The course focuses on emerging techniques and applications used in food analysis and their potential and challenges. Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): The following undergraduate courses are required: CHEM 1110, MATH 1110, and AGSC 4460.
  •  

    AGSC 5610-5620 - Graduate Seminar in Agricultural Sciences (1-1)


    Critical review of current literature in Agricultural Sciences. Required of all M.S. graduate students.
  •  

    AGSC 5900 - Applied Entomology (3)


    This course provides a foundation in applied entomology covering topics including insect morphology, insect behavior, reproduction and biology, insect classification, insect collection and preservation, insects as pests and their management with pesticides, natural enemies, and host plants.  Emphasis is placed on the application of entomology in agriculture, horticulture, forestry, and everyday life. 
  •  

    AGSC 6010 - Gene Structure and Function (3)


    This is graduate level course about genes, how the information they contain is transmitted and expressed in the form of a phenotype. Students will study nucleic acid structure and the mechanics of replication, repair, transcription, and translation in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. A central goal is understanding gene regulation at different levels and the structure-function relationships of nucleic acids and proteins. Particular attention will be given to applications of this knowledge in gene manipulation organisms for biotechnological products.
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    AGSC 6510 - Advanced Geospatial Information System (3)


    This is a graduate level course about genes, how the information they contain is transmitted and expressed in the form of a phenotype. Students will study nucleic acid structure and the mechanics of replication, repair, transcription, and translation in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. A central goal is understanding gene regulation at different levels and the structure-function relationships of nucleic acids and proteins. Particular attention will be given to applications of this knowledge in gene manipulation organisms for biotechnological products.
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    AGSC 6520 - Advanced Spatial Analysis (3)


    Evaluates the concepts and analytical procedures used to extract and simplify complex systems using geospatial information systems (GIS). This course analyzes geometric, coincidence, and adjacency models as applied to surface analysis, linear analysis, raster analysis, topological overlay, and contiguity analysis. Spatial modeling will be used to analyze, simulate, predict, and resolve real-world problems and issues. Upon successful completion of Advanced Spatial Analysis, students will have the knowledge and skills to develop and differentiate between advanced spatial statistical models needed to predict and solve real-world problems correlated to geospatial data. Students should be able to: apply the terminology and concepts of spatial analysis and modeling; apply specific forms of three-dimensional spatial data and their structure, organization, and analysis; differentiate between methodologies used in spatial analysis; interpret the representation of three-dimensional spatial data through spatial statistics; and apply concepts of planning used in the spatial analysis decision- making processes Systems. Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): AGSC 6510
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    AGSC 6525 - Remote Sensing and Image Analysis (3)


    This course evaluates the concepts and analytical procedures used to extract and simplify complex systems using geospatial information systems (GIS). This course analyzes geometric, coincidence, and adjacency models as applied to surface analysis, linear analysis, raster analysis, topological overlay, and contiguity analysis. Spatial modeling will be used to analyze, simulate, predict, and resolve real-world problems and issues. Upon successful completion of Advanced Spatial Analysis, students will have the knowledge and skills to develop and differentiate between advanced spatial statistical models needed to predict and solve real-world problems correlated to geospatial data. Students should be able to: apply the terminology and concepts of spatial analysis and modeling; apply specific forms of three-dimensional spatial data and their structure, organization, and analysis; differentiate between methodologies used in spatial analysis; interpret the representation of three-dimensional spatial data through spatial statistics; and apply concepts of planning used in the spatial analysis decision- making processes.
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    AGSC 6530 - Advanced Geospatial Metadata (3)


    An examination of geospatial data that make up the most expensive component of a geospatial information system (GIS) and accounts for billions of dollars of expenditures annually. Upon successful completion of Advanced Geospatial Metadata, students will demonstrate knowledge about metadata through the evaluation of background data correlated to the various types of GIS data. Students should be able to: differentiate between critical information attached to metadata; differentiate between different procedures used to create and maintain metadata; evaluate metadata and its components; demonstrate to GIS users the how and why there are needs for documenting their data.  Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): AGSC 6510
  •  

    AGSC 6540 - Advanced Spatial Database Design and Management (3)


    An examination and demonstration of the accuracy and usability of data that determines the analysis, output, and cost of any geospatial information system (GIS) using techniques that include python programming.  Upon successful completion of Advanced Spatial Database Design and Management, students should be able to evaluate and differentiate between geodatabase and database design; editing; and management within a GIS.   Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): AGSC 6510; AGSC 6520
  •  

    AGSC 6550 - Advanced Spatial Information Systems Application and Design (3)


    Concepts and procedures used to successfully assess needs, evaluate requirements, design, and implement geospatial information systems (GIS).  Upon successful completion of Advanced Geospatial Information Systems Application and Design, students will be able to develop, evaluate, and differentiate between data and technology needed to produce desired information products.  Students should also be able to: demonstrate cost-benefit analysis and project proposal development.   Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): AGSC 6510, AGSC 6520.
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    AGSC 6560 - Advanced Global Positioning Systems (3)


    Principles, technology, and use of Global Positioning Systems (GPS). Upon successful completion of GPS, students will have the knowledge and skills to evaluate and differentiate between the principles of navigation and positioning. Students should be able to: evaluate and differentiate between GPS instrumentation; evaluate and differentiate between the collection and processing of data; and evaluate and differentiate between the integration of GPS with geospatial information systems (GIS).

    NOTE: This course is only eligible for students within driving commuting distance of TSU. Prerequisite(s): None

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    AGSC 6585 - Internship in Applied Geospatial Sciences (3)


    This is not an online course and has an on-ground requirement lasting 13 weeks over the summer term.  It provides on-the-job experience enabling students to perform adequately in a professional business setting and requires at least 300 hours of participation in an assigned and approved professional setting under a practitioner’s guidance with at least one standardized national AGS certification. Students must complete AGSC 6510 and AGSC 6525 or AGSC 6560 before they enroll in internship course. Students can take other courses concurrently.  Prerequisite(s): AGSC 6510, AGSC 6520 Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): AGSC 6510  , AGSC 6520  
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    AGSC 7010 - Advancement in Agricultural Biotechnology (3)


    A review of recent advances in biotechnology in agriculture with emphasis on experimental techniques and application in improvement of livestock and crop production. Prerequisite(s): Animal and Plant Genetics (AGSC 3400).
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    AGSC 7020 - Economic, Regulatory and Ethical Issues in Biotechnology (3)


    This course will analyze factors affecting the development of biotechnology using economic principles and discuss regulatory and ethical issues as they relate to plant and animal products and by-products. Prerequisite(s): At least 6 credits in economics courses, of which 3 credits should be in intermediate level economic theory.
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    AGSC 7030 - Gene Expression and Regulation in Eukaryotes (3)


    A study of gene structure in higher plants, and gene expression and its regulation in plant growth development, morphogenesis, reproduction, response to environmental stress and defense mechanism. Special topics such as transposable elements, Arabidopsis, molecular plant breeding will be included. Prerequisite(s): AGSC 5190  or BIOL 5110 .
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    AGSC 7040 - Plant Tissue Culture Methods and Applications (3)


    Emphasis on hands-on laboratory procedures. Application of tissue culture techniques for the improvement of economic plants will be emphasized. Prerequisite(s): An introductory course in botany and plant physiology.
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    AGSC 7050 - Biotechnology in Animal Reproduction (3)


    Discussion on the various advances in techniques used to enhance animal reproduction and livestock productivity. Basic concepts of mammalian reproductive function will be studied. However, students should have a working knowledge of reproductive physiology. Methods such as artificial insemination, embryo transfer, in vitro fertilization, and embryo manipulation will be covered. Topics will be viewed from basic and applied perspectives. A comprehensive review of current literature will be included as a part of all discussions. Laboratory time in connection with this course will provide hands-on experience with some practices associated with reproductive biology. Prerequisite(s): Previous course in Reproductive.
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    AGSC 7060 - Soil Technology (3)


    Evaluation of soil utilizing most recent advances in physical-chemical properties, soil structure, metric potential, water management/conservation techniques, and irrigation systems and pollution abatement. Prerequisite(s): AGSC 2200, 4230; Basic Chemistry and Calculus.
  •  

    AGSC 7070 - Applied Genomics (3)


    This course is designed for graduate students to understand and discuss the advanced topics in functional genomics, bioinformatics and tools and software commonly used in the field of next-generation sequencing technologies and explore the underlying sources of genetic variation in populations. It helps students learn how to detect and analyze this variation and how to interpret observed variation. It is a combination of lectures, group discussion and hands-on training on tools, scripts, and software for analyzing data generated in this field. The course will familiarize the students with current methods in genomics and bioinformatics. The emphasis for this course is more on practical aspects of genomics research.  Prerequisite(s): Undergraduate or Graduate Genetics.
  •  

    AGSC 7080 - Host-Microbe Interactions (3)


    This course will comprise a comprehensive treatment of various molecular interactions between prokaryotes, including, bacteria, Spiroplasma and Phytoplasma and their hosts. Emphasis will be placed on the current understanding of pathogenesis and symbiotic interactions at the molecular level. Discussions will touch on the different investigative approaches used to study these interactions, host response and signaling systems and the various applications of these understanding in agriculture, medicine and environment.
  •  

    AGSC 7500 - Environmental Issues and Sustainability (3)


    This course focuses on current environmental issues and provides students with an understanding of the scientific concepts behind important topics which include environmental sustainability, environmental regulations, climate change, and environmental pollution. Focus will be placed on environmental issues that relate to agriculture but may also include the natural environment. Identification of methods for preventing or reducing impact as well as improving environmental integrity and enhancing sustainability will be discussed. One lecture and one discussion period per week. 
  •  

    AGSC 7510 - Ecosystem Science and Management (3)


    This course focuses on current environmental issues and provides students with an understanding of the scientific concepts behind important topics which include environmental sustainability, environmental regulations, climate change, and environmental pollution.  The focus will be placed on environmental issues that relate to agriculture but may also include the natural environment.  Identification of methods for preventing or reducing the impact as well as improving environmental integrity and enhancing sustainability will be discussed.  One lecture and one discussion period per week. 
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    AGSC 7590 - Applied Multivariate Statistics (3)


    The course provides an advanced introduction to applied Multivariate Statistics. Course materials will provide students with a broad understanding of multivariate analysis and data preparation techniques. This course will focus on a variety of analysis techniques, including multivariate logistic and linear regression, multiple analysis of variance, discriminant function analysis, cluster analysis, and ordination techniques, including principal components analysis and canonical correspondence analysis. Considerable course time will be allocated to data preparation, screening, and analysis using common statistical software package
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    AGSC 7900 - Applied Entomology (3)


    This course provides a foundation in applied entomology covering topics including insect morphology, insect behavior, reproduction and biology, insect classification, insect collection and preservation, insects as pests and their management with pesticides, natural enemies, and host plants.  Emphasis is placed on the application of entomology in agriculture, horticulture, forestry, and everyday life. 
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    NUFS 5560 - Functional Foods for Health (3)


    A course in nutrition with emphasis on functional foods and human chronic diseases prevention. The introductory material covers basic definitions of functional foods, nutraceuticals and human chronic diseases as well as major functional foods and their bioactive ingredients. The composition, chemistry and bioaccessibility and bioavailability of nutraceuticals as well as the current regulations of functional foods are reviewed. The second half of the course discusses various functional foods on human chronic diseases including cancer, obesity, neurodegenerative diseases, heart disease, diabetes, sarcopenia, aging, osteoporosis, skin disorders and infectious disease. Through lectures, tutorials and problem/solving exercises, students will learn the importance of chemical composition, bioavailability of nutraceuticals from various functional foods as well as the effects of these foods on human chronic diseases treatment and prevention.  Prerequisite(s): NUFS 2110, CHEM 2010 or permission of instructor. 

Graduate Certificate in Applied Geospatial Information Systems

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